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Cats are among those things I just can’t draw convincingly. Them and dogs. And horses. And people. Okay, I can draw things convincingly as long as they aren’t realistic.

Anyway! This is the dreaded Wild Cat of Craig-na-Seanean and a little friend. Found near Doo-Lough, this ferocious feline had a moon-shaped marking on its forehead and a sharp nail on the end of its tail. It killed and ate hundreds of people until it was slain by three heroic brothers who impaled it on their spears. The cat was then hacked to particles and burnt to ashes to prevent the potential spread of plague.

Z is for… Zoureg

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The Zoureg is a mysterious Arabian snake. Despite being only a foot long, nothing can stop it once it starts moving. Trees, rocks, human beings – the zoureg goes through them like a hot knife through butter (with fatal results on humans, obviously). The only way to kill it is to decapitate it in its sleep.

Y is for… Ya-te-veo

The Ya-te-veo (literally “I see you”) is, as far as anyone knows, only described by Buel in his book Sea and Land. Since it’s found in both Africa and South America, it’s either a Wegenerian miracle or an amalgamation of all carnivorous plant tall tales. It tends to look like a comfy seat before snaring people in its spiked tentacles and giving them the Iron Maiden treatment. Excellent!

X is for… Xiao

The name Xiao is used for two creatures in the Guideways, an ape and a bird, both of which are noisy. The Xiao or Raucous-bird has four wings, one eye, a dog’s tail, and caws like a magpie. Eating it cures stomachache and diarrhea. The Guideways assures us that it resembles Kuafu the Boaster (it doesn’t).

And the solution to the previous quiz? It’s a beaver. It is described as living in rivers, both on land and in the water, and building houses with multiple chambers and exits.

Never underestimate the power of an artist who has no idea what they’re drawing.