Billdad

Variations: Saltipiscator falcorostratus (Cox)

Boundary Pond in Maine, near the Canadian border, is the only spot where Billdads live. These creatures are beaver-sized with long kangaroo-like back legs and short forelegs. The paws are webbed and the beak is strong and hawk-like. The powerful tail is large and flattened, like a beaver’s.

The first hint that a billdad is about is a distinct sound, like a paddle hitting the water. This is caused by the billdad’s method of fishing, which consists of jumping above a surfacing fish and smacking it hard with its flat tail. Adult males can cover over sixty yards in a single leap. The stunned fish can then be collected and eaten at leisure.

The retiring billdads are usually heard and not seen. They are left alone by lumberjacks – and with good reason. The only man known to have eaten billdad meat, the late Bill Murphy, suffered odd symptoms after tasting it. He ran screaming out of the mess hall and leaped over the lake just like a billdad. Alas, he could not swim like one.

Billdad has been off the menu since.

References

Cox, W. T. (1910) Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods with a Few Desert and Mountain Beasts. Judd and Detweiler, Washington D. C.

16 Comments

  1. I misread “Bill Murphy” as “Bill Murray,” as in the actor from Ghostbusters and Groundhog Day, and I was like, “Wow, that’s oddly recent, and not how I was expecting to find out a famous actor had died,” and then I read slightly further in the sentence and went back and looked a second time.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wonderful work on this creature, although I don’t remember seeing the Billdad having a lack of fur like a Naked Molerat, but have some questions? Are all these Fearsome Critters including Mr. Billdad invented by William Cox or did Cox claimed to have seen these creatures in the Americas? And if anyone were to involve theses creatures the Billdad included, would be plagiarism even if giving credit to Mr. Cox

    Like

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